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Volver a Network Dynamics of Social Behavior

Network Dynamics of Social Behavior, Universidad de Pensilvania

4.6
112 calificaciones
34 revisiones

Acerca de este Curso

How do revolutions emerge without anyone expecting them? How did social norms about same sex marriage change more rapidly than anyone anticipated? Why do some social innovations take off with relative ease, while others struggle for years without spreading? More generally, what are the forces that control the process of social evolution –from the fashions that we wear, to our beliefs about religious tolerance, to our ideas about the process of scientific discovery and the best ways to manage complex research organizations? The social world is complex and full of surprises. Our experiences and intuitions about the social world as individuals are often quite different from the behaviors that we observe emerging in large societies. Even minor changes to the structure of a social network - changes that are unobservable to individuals within those networks - can lead to radical shifts in the spread of new ideas and behaviors through a population. These “invisible” mathematical properties of social networks have powerful implications for the ways that teams solve problems, the social norms that are likely to emerge, and even the very future of our society. This course condenses the last decade of cutting-edge research on these topics into six modules. Each module provides an in-depth look at a particular research puzzle -with a focus on agent-based models and network theories of social change -and provides an interactive computational model for you try out and to use for making your own explorations! Learning objectives - after this course, students will be able to... - explain how computer models are used to study challenging social problems - describe how networks are used to represent the structure of social relationships - show how individual actions can lead to unintended collective behaviors - provide concrete examples of how social networks can influence social change - discuss how diffusion processes can explain the growth social movements, changes in cultural norms, and the success of team problem solving...

Principales revisiones

por SC

Jan 21, 2018

A Crisp yet effective overview of some of the most critical works in the field of Networking. Anyone from the fields of Management, Sociology, Anthropology et al should try the MOOC.

por AF

Nov 21, 2017

Although the course was very short and the homework were so easy, I'm quite satisfied by the insight I got from Prof Centola

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33 revisiones

por Aleix Dorca

Mar 17, 2019

Very interesting topics. I can't wait to apply them to current research.

por Ignacio Ojea

Feb 01, 2019

Great introductory course, although a bit too easy.

por Ramkumar Iyer

Jan 09, 2019

Simple concise videos. Crisp explanations. Cool demos with Netlogo.

por Thiago de Sa Earp Pagliarelli

Dec 13, 2018

Insightful, packs a lot of information in a deceivingly simple manner. Challenges intuition with proper models and raises as many (if not more) questions than it answers, which couldn't be any better as fuel for learning. Thumbs up, and would love to see more and more in-depth material on the theme from the instructors.

por Martin Lukac

Dec 04, 2018

Interesting course! Concepts are very well explained, but it misses practical classes in NetLogo.

por YAO ERIC MARC KOUADIO

Nov 24, 2018

It was a very good class and I learned a lot. Thanks for sharing and continue the good job.

por Sonia Lopez-Baisson

Oct 22, 2018

Congratulations to the team for the simplicity with wich they have been able to transmit complex concepts. I am amaze of how some social assumptions change when you model them. I have learn a lot and created more curiosity to continue investigating about network dynamics of social behavior.

por pranav nerurkar

Sep 05, 2018

needs more practical exercises

por bhanu

Aug 07, 2018

wonderful experience

por Jack Orlik

Aug 04, 2018

An excellent and inspiring introduction to a new approach to sociology.