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Philosophy, Science and Religion: Science and Philosophy, The University of Edinburgh

4.3
362 calificaciones
108 revisiones

Acerca de este Curso

Philosophy, Science and Religion mark three of the most fundamental modes of thinking about the world and our place in it. Are these modes incompatible? Put another way: is the intellectually responsible thing to do to ‘pick sides’ and identify with one of these approaches at the exclusion of others? Or, are they complementary or mutually supportive? As is typical of questions of such magnitude, the devil is in the details. For example, it is important to work out what is really distinctive about each of these ways of inquiring about the world. In order to gain some clarity here, we’ll be investigating what some of the current leading thinkers in philosophy, science and religion are actually doing. This course, entitled ‘Science and Philosophy’, is the first of three related courses in our Philosophy, Science and Religion Online series. The first launch is now closed to enrolments. We will launch a new version of the course in July 2018. The course will address four themes each presented by guest lecturers: 1. Are Science and Religion in conflict? (Professor Michael Murray, Franklin & Marshall) 2. Neuroscience and Free Will (Professor Al Mele, Florida State) 3. Creationism and Evolutionary Biology--Science or Pseudo-science? (Dr. Mark Harris and Dr. David de Pomerai, University of Edinburgh) 4. Do Scientific claims constitute absolute truths? (Professor Martin Kusch, University of Vienna) The second and third courses in the Philosophy, Science and Religion series are ‘Philosophy and Religion’ and ‘Religion and Science’. They may be taken in any order and completing all three courses will give you a broader understanding of this fascinating topic. Look for: • Philosophy, Science and Religion II: Philosophy and Religion • Philosophy, Science and Religion III: Religion and Science Check out our trailer to hear more: https://youtu.be/OifqTI5VKek You can also follow us on Twitter at https://twitter.com/EdiPhilOnline and you can follow the hashtag #psrmooc...

Principales revisiones

por SR

Nov 14, 2017

A very interesting course and it has given a great knowleddge to me about the concept of science and religion . just amazed and the professors taught this in a very impressive way . very nyccc .

por CB

Feb 06, 2017

I really enjoyed this course and the effort it put forth to open the dialogue of religion, science and philosophy. Thank you for creating a space to openly discuss belief.

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106 revisiones

por Emiel de Jonge

Dec 08, 2018

In the beginning of the course I had the sense that the course was somewhat biased towards religion. But later on I found out that both aspects are explained quite honest and well in the course. All in all well worth the time and effort.

por Harvey Berrington

Nov 19, 2018

Interesting and varied, if slightly basic at times.

por Solveig Hudresen

Nov 11, 2018

An excellent and interesting range of lectures. Not particularly fond of the Stanford readings, but such is life. Very enjoyable!

por Tan Joo Fu

Oct 17, 2018

Interesting course to learn from!

por Jared Emry

Oct 01, 2018

No substance. This is all very low level stuff. I can't say that there is actually any engagement between science and philosophy here. Let's talk a bit about nested structures next time. Mmkay.

por Christopher Whitehead

Jun 10, 2018

A thought-provoking and informative course.

por Christopher Morris

Jun 06, 2018

The aim of these three courses seems to be to persuade people that the debate about the compatibility or otherwise of Christianity (and there's very little attempt here to disguise the view that 'religion' means Christianity) and science is genuinely important. Do they succeed? I don't think so; the somewhat confusing view of science presented by the course creators - that scientists have deliberately chosen naturalism as their metaphysical foundation, refusing to acknowledge any supernatural possibility, and consequently need to 'change their story' whenever they encounter new evidence leaving science weak and unreliable but on the other hand, that science is so powerful and successful that 'scientism' is a real threat to the future of humanity - contrasts with the uncritical view of Christianity (what little critical assessment there is, is laughable in my view) to such an extent that any debate would be meaningless. As far as I can see this remains a problem within Christianity between young earth fundamentalists and those, such as the Templeton Foundation who financed the courses, who want Christianity to be acceptable and relevant in modern society. I think Christians should be free to believe whichever of the hundreds of different types of Christianity they want but that, in the same way that they don't want science imposing a naturalistic view on everyone, they shouldn't expect everyone else to believe the same things that they do.

por Andrii Bazylevych

May 24, 2018

Very good course

por Juan David Gamboa Guzmán

May 01, 2018

This is an incredibly terrible course, that only serves as propaganda for Christian creationism. Some of the lecturers are people completely unknowledgeable about both science and philosophy. It is incredibly sad that an university of such quality and history would lend its name for such endeavors.

por Pedro Antonio Favuzzi

Apr 27, 2018

Too long for its content.