Acerca de este Curso
4.8
38 ratings
6 reviews
Throughout the world, writing serves to express, record and even create meaningful moments. In academic spaces, writing becomes the bridge between ourselves and the world of ideas. In this course, we provide practical insights into how to write an academic essay. We show you how to develop the academic skills needed to be a competent academic writer. You will have an opportunity to engage with texts written by academics, and to see how some of the ideas in these texts are used by students in constructing an academic essay. We address some of the challenges these students face with respect to academic writing and offer you the opportunity to practice and to develop your own writing style. For this course, we centre our lessons around a specific topic - the concept of identity, since it forms such an important feature of how we locate ourselves in an ever-changing global world. In other words, this course teaches academic writing skills through getting you to write and reflect on your understanding of identity. So if you are thinking about studying at a tertiary institution, or if you just want to brush up on your academic essay writing skills, this course is for you!...
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Fechas límite flexibles

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Beginner Level

Nivel principiante

Clock

Sugerido: 2-3 hours of study per week

Aprox. 12 horas para completar
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English

Subtítulos: English
Globe

Cursos 100 % en línea

Comienza de inmediato y aprende a tu propio ritmo.
Calendar

Fechas límite flexibles

Restablece las fechas límite en función de tus horarios.
Beginner Level

Nivel principiante

Clock

Sugerido: 2-3 hours of study per week

Aprox. 12 horas para completar
Comment Dots

English

Subtítulos: English

Programa - Qué aprenderás en este curso

1

Sección
Clock
4 horas para completar

Starting to write: Understanding definitions of identity

This week, we will consider practical aspects of academic writing, such as structure and the importance of defining key terms in an essay. The term we will focus on this week is identity. After hearing Kath Woodward’s ideas on identity, our three student writers, Ada, Ziggy, and Joey will write their own definitions of identity. Emphasising that writing is a process, we will give feedback on the students writers’ definitions. We will then provide you with the opportunity to draft your definition of identity, give feedback to other learners and receive feedback from them....
Reading
10 videos (Total: 59 min), 5 readings, 4 quizzes
Video10 videos
Thinking about your essay6m
Meet our student writers5m
Through the looking glass: Who am I?5m
Woodward on identity: I, me and the world11m
Woodward on identity: Roots and routes12m
How do definitions work?3m
Definitions in context3m
Drafting your definition1m
Giving feedback on definitions4m
Reading5 lecturas
How this course works10m
Meet your instructors5m
Week 1: What to expect10m
Summary of Woodward's interview10m
Week 1 recommended readings10m
Quiz3 ejercicios de práctica
Is this course right for you?20m
Woodward Practice Quiz6m
Week 1 Graded Quiz8m

2

Sección
Clock
3 horas para completar

Developing an argument: shifting identities

Week 2 further develops the concept of identity by considering the effects of mobility on one’s identity. Throughout history, as individuals moved across borders, they were either welcomed or perceived as an outsider or a threat. In South Africa during Apartheid, people within the country were further separated into ‘homelands’, and those who challenged the boundaries such as Nelson Mandela were labelled as criminals and terrorists. To help you formulate ideas on such concepts in your essay, we now consider the features of a good academic essay focusing on the introduction. We also introduce a three-part strategy to approach your readings: preview, overview and inview. The task for this week is drafting an introduction at university level. We identify key features of an introduction, then look at introductions written by our three student writers, and provide them with constructive feedback....
Reading
10 videos (Total: 51 min), 3 readings, 4 quizzes
Video10 videos
Identity and mobility through the ages3m
Nelson Mandela: Terrorist or freedom fighter?3m
Reading strategies6m
Applying reading strategies: Sichone’s chapter4m
Applying reading strategies: Blommaert’s chapter7m
Understanding the course essay4m
Drafting your introduction6m
Giving feedback on introductions9m
Relationship between the introduction and conclusion2m
Reading3 lecturas
Week 2: What to expect10m
Required reading - Xenophobia by Owen Sichone10m
Required reading - Discourse by Blommaert10m
Quiz3 ejercicios de práctica
Sichone and Blommaert practice quiz4m
Week 2 practice quiz12m
Critique an introduction quiz10m

3

Sección
Clock
4 horas para completar

Supporting the argument: situating identity within culture

This week begins with a discussion of culture and its relevance when individuals become mobile, moving between geographical and social contexts. We look at a case study of a student from the United Kingdom who comes to Johannesburg, South Africa. The case study helps us to think about who owns culture and how different or similar we are across contexts. Next, we consider Thornton’s arguments about culture. He argues against the view that there are many cultures and notes that there is only culture. Thornton considers culture as a resource to which people have different degrees of access. Some examples of cultural resources are clothes, money, beliefs, ideas. Individuals draw on these to construct their identity, but unequal access to these resources that are valued gives some people more possibilities to construct identities that are dominant and more valued. This creates a semblance of difference between groups of people. As people move across borders, these differences may become heightened, because some of the cultural resources that an individual carries with her, may cease to be relevant or may be seen as threatening. So, when supporting one’s argument about what happens to identity as individuals move across borders, it is important to delve into culture and how culture creates differences, how it may accentuate boundaries, and how these may or may not impact on identity. Writing paragraphs in support of one’s argument requires close attention to how the paragraphs link with the position, and with other ideas across the paragraphs. Hence, we offer practical guidelines on paragraphing, coherence and cohesion. We give an example of a well-written paragraph and analyse its form to see why it is good. We then review paragraphs submitted by our three student writers and note what is strong and what could be improved in each. We introduce the core aspects of referencing in essays. We also explain why referencing is an important part of academic writing when we are referring to different people’s views (or voices) and distinguishing these from our own. ...
Reading
12 videos (Total: 62 min), 3 readings, 4 quizzes
Video12 videos
Case study of an international student1m
Pool of abundance: Understanding culture6m
Round table discussion on culture13m
Writing paragraphs3m
Quotes and paraphrasing3m
In-text referencing4m
Coherence and cohesion3m
Student writers drafting their paragraphs8m
Giving feedback on Ada’s paragraph5m
Giving feedback on Ziggy’s paragraph5m
Giving feedback on Joey's paragraphs3m
Reading3 lecturas
Week 3: What to expect10m
Required reading: Culture: A contemporary definition by Thornton10m
Cohesive devices - Linking words10m
Quiz3 ejercicios de práctica
Thornton Quiz8m
Week 3 practice quiz8m
Paragraph development quiz12m

4

Sección
Clock
3 horas para completar

Starting to finish: writing the first draft

This week we sum up the ground we have covered in this course. The week is about crafting your final essay draft. We recap the building blocks of writing an academic essay, relooking at the features of an introduction, body, conclusion and the purposes of cohesion, coherence and referencing. We also consider and provide engaged feedback on the draft essays written by our three virtual students. There is detailed feedback on the strengths, improvements and opportunities for further improvement on the essays. The feedback is aligned with the core skills introduced in the course, such as writing the topic sentence, linking sentences and ensuring coherence and cohesion. Thereafter we sum up the course with a discussion on the ideas of the four thinkers you were introduced to in this course, namely Woodward, Sichone, Blommaert and Thornton. ...
Reading
8 videos (Total: 46 min), 1 reading, 3 quizzes
Video8 videos
Round table discussion: Reflection on the readings14m
The essay building blocks5m
Referencing and managing sources5m
Giving feedback on Ziggy's draft7m
Giving feedback on Joey's draft3m
Giving feedback on Ada's draft3m
Looking forward2m
Reading1 lectura
Week 4: What to expect10m
Quiz2 ejercicios de práctica
Week 4 practice quiz6m
Critique an essay12m
4.8

Principales revisiones

por RWMay 31st 2018

it was very helpful with my writing skills my essay marks improved as I was able to apply what I learnt from the mooc

por IKApr 29th 2018

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Instructores

Gideon Nomdo

Lecturer
Centre for Higher Education Development

Aditi Hunma

Lecturer
Centre for Higher Education Development

Acerca de University of Cape Town

The University of Cape Town is the oldest university in South Africa and is one of the leading research universities on the African continent. UCT has over 25 000 students, of whom 30% are postgraduate students. We offer degrees in six faculties: Commerce, Engineering & the Built Environment, Health Sciences, Humanities, Law, and Science. We pride ourself on our diverse student body, which reflects the many cultures and backgrounds of the region. We welcome international students and are currently home to thousands of international students from over 100 countries. UCT has a tradition of academic excellence that is respected world-wide and is privileged to have more than 30 A-rated researchers on our staff, all of whom are recognised as world leaders in their field. Our aim is to ensure that our research contributes to the public good through sharing knowledge for the benefit of society. Past students include five Nobel Laureates – Max Theiler, Alan Cormack, Sir Aaron Klug, Ralph Bunche and, most recently, J M Coetzee....

Preguntas Frecuentes

  • Once you enroll for a Certificate, you’ll have access to all videos, quizzes, and programming assignments (if applicable). Peer review assignments can only be submitted and reviewed once your session has begun. If you choose to explore the course without purchasing, you may not be able to access certain assignments.

  • When you purchase a Certificate you get access to all course materials, including graded assignments. Upon completing the course, your electronic Certificate will be added to your Accomplishments page - from there, you can print your Certificate or add it to your LinkedIn profile. If you only want to read and view the course content, you can audit the course for free.

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