Created by:  University of Alberta

  • Dr. Tracy Bear

    Taught by:  Dr. Tracy Bear, Assistant Professor

    Faculty of Native Studies & Dept. of Women's and Gender Studies

  • Dr. Paul Gareau

    Taught by:  Dr. Paul Gareau, Assistant Professor

    Faculty of Native Studies
Commitment12 weeks, 3-5 hours a week.
Language
English
How To PassPass all graded assignments to complete the course.
User Ratings
4.8 stars
Average User Rating 4.8See what learners said
Syllabus

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Coursework
Coursework

Each course is like an interactive textbook, featuring pre-recorded videos, quizzes and projects.

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Creators
University of Alberta
UAlberta is considered among the world’s leading public research- and teaching-intensive universities. As one of Canada’s top universities, we’re known for excellence across the humanities, sciences, creative arts, business, engineering and health sciences.
Ratings and Reviews
Rated 4.8 out of 5 of 81 ratings

I learnt a lot. Really love the course!!!!

Everyone should take this course - it was amazing.

When I see indigenous people comment online, they trash-talk both government and first nations community leaders alike. They distrust both the government who never came through on promises and the leaders who have underfunded their communities for their own enjoyment.

I didn't see many solutions suggested or a means to an end to some of these issues in this course so in spite of my new found knowledge it would seem this will remain a vicious circle of poverty, distrust, and fear and this saddens me that that there is still little hope for a resolution.

However, this course did bring to light many aspects of my heritage that I was not aware of. My birth father is Métis however my birth mother is not. I was given up for adoption to a Caucasian family when I was 8 months old, so was unaware of being Métis for almost all of my life, let alone did I ever feel remotely a part of it once I found out. So this course also suggested that when you are no longer a part of the Indigenous culture and do not look Indigenous in any way, and because you will never experience the hardships or really know anyone who has, you will never be part of that culture. It's like you get to sit in the front row but will never be in the show.

The rest of the course was okay, the history I knew, the issues I knew, although the elaboration of them was nice. The introduction of key individuals in forming some semblance of a united indigenous culture were good to know. But this course also reminded me that indigeneity in Canada is also about a fractured and injured culture of people, who are separated by language, distance and who will never have the funding that other communities enjoy, and it will never be a whole. After all had there been more formal territories when NA was colonized, maybe it wouldn't be indigenous Canada, it would be Enoch Territory or Papaschase Territory or State and many others where Alberta currently sits and it would now be the United Territories of North America, but alas that will never be.

Informative, and necessary for every Canadian vested in our rich history.