Created by:  Duke University

  • Mine Çetinkaya-Rundel

    Taught by:  Mine Çetinkaya-Rundel, Assistant Professor of the Practice

    Department of Statistical Science

  • David Banks

    Taught by:  David Banks, Professor of the Practice

    Statistical Science

  • Colin Rundel

    Taught by:  Colin Rundel , Assistant Professor of the Practice

    Statistical Science

  • Merlise A Clyde

    Taught by:  Merlise A Clyde, Professor

    Department of Statistical Science
Basic Info
Course 4 of 5 in the Statistics with R Specialization.
LevelIntermediate
Commitment5 weeks of study, 5-7 hours/week
Language
English
How To PassPass all graded assignments to complete the course.
User Ratings
3.8 stars
Average User Rating 3.8See what learners said
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Duke University
Duke University has about 13,000 undergraduate and graduate students and a world-class faculty helping to expand the frontiers of knowledge. The university has a strong commitment to applying knowledge in service to society, both near its North Carolina campus and around the world.
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Ratings and Reviews
Rated 3.8 out of 5 of 200 ratings

This is a very interesting topic. Lectures in weeks 3 and 4 could use some work.

Good

This is one of many good courses that one can get a glimpse of Bayesian statistics though it lacks of thorough explanation of mathematical background and reading materials of any kind.

It was nice learning all the distribution functions and Bayesian statistics. However, I have one suggestion: When going through equations, it's better to dive a little deeper into them, or at least go through a few steps of derivation, rather than just show them on the screen. For example, in 'Bayesian Regression' when introducing 'conjugate bivariant normal-gamma distribution, it was directly given three correlations on the screen: (1) alpha | sigma^2 ~ N(a0, sigma^2 S_alpha, (2) beta | sigma^2 ~ N(b0, sigma^2 S_beta), (3) 1/(sigma^2) ~ G(mu_0/2, mu_0 sigma^2/2. There are many terms in the equation. It would be more learner friendly if one can at least go through what term corresponding to what. Or if time is a constraint one can at least show some reasonable reference, so that learners can search for papers. I had to do quite an amount of googling to get through these things.